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Delivering a sustainable water supply to sportsgrounds in Maroondah

Maroondah is set to receive a new stormwater harvesting facility, that will provide much-needed irrigation to local sportsgrounds, thanks to a $310,000 grant from Yarra Valley Water.

The funding will go towards the Reimagining Tarralla Creek Project, a joint initiative of Maroondah City Council, Melbourne Water and Yarra Valley Water, which will transform a two-kilometre section of the creek into a family-friendly open space.

Yarra Valley Water Managing Director Pat McCafferty said that Yarra Valley Water is very proud to contribute to a project that will benefit the local community.

“People are spending more time than ever where they live, and projects that contribute to the health and wellbeing of the local environment have never been more important.

“We look forward to establishing a sustainable supply of stormwater that will benefit local sportsgrounds and parks for years to come, especially as the weather becomes hotter and drier,” Mr McCafferty said.

Tarralla Creek is a recreational destination for several thousand people living within one kilometre of the creek. Thousands more also work, study and play within the adjacent Croydon Town Centre and Swinburne University campus, and use the Carrum-Warburton shared trail which is adjacent to Tarralla Creek.

Additional funding for the project will come from the Victorian Government’s $4.5 million Integrated Water Management Grants Program.

Melbourne Water Waterways and Land General Manager Dr Kirsten Shelly said the Reimagining Your Creek program is already transforming waterways around Greater Melbourne.

“Melbourne Water is excited to be collaborating with Maroondah City Council and Yarra Valley Water, community representatives and residents to reimagine this stretch of Tarralla Creek.  

“By working together, we are transforming storm water drains and creeks into waterways and desirable open spaces where people can interact with nature in cooler, healthier environments,” Dr Shelly said.